Ruddy
Ruddy Fly, Berners

FLY FISHING DICTIONARY
Midge
Midge Flies
 
 
Fly-Fisher's Entomology  English book
  A book written in 1836 by Alfred Ronalds in England on aquatic insects and its corresponding fly patterns from the standpoint of a fly fisher. Ronalds recorded exclusively what he actually observed himself, and its originality is extremely high.
  The book contains beautiful watercolor paintings of copper plate drawings on 16 pages, and 47 fly patterns corresponding to 47 aquatic insects are depicted. In addition to a sketch of an insect, its scientific name, common name, the area the insect prefers to live in, their emergence time and emergence type are recorded. Additionally fly tying recipes are presented in detail. Please refer to the color pages on Yellow Sally, Alder Fly, Red Ant, and Whirling Blue Dun in this book.
  Before this book was published, aquatic insects had been called by common names such as olive, blue dun, or grannom. It could be argued that correct correspondence of a natural fly to a fly pattern had been difficult. By giving the scientific name (Latin) of an insect for the first time, he accomplished a more exact correspondence of aquatic insects and flies. The author believes this book was the actual and academic starting point in the long history of the match-the-hatch principle in fly fishing. It is a monumental book in the history of fly fishing!
  In addition, Ronalds described the reflection and refraction of light at the water surface, the underwater posture of trout, and the vision and sense of smell of trout, by drawing pictures and descriptions that are highly acclaimed.
 The author dusted the wallet and purchased the 5th edition published by Longman, London in 1856, a book with beautiful dark green cover. Refer to a color and XX page.
ReferenceFly-fisher's entomology, 1856 (1836).
Alfred Ronalds
 
 
 
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A path in the forest leading to a river. Yamanashi Pref., Japan.
A path in the forest leading to a river. Yamanashi Pref., Japan.
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