Hinotori
Hinotori

FLY FISHING DICTIONARY
Quill
Quill Gordon
   
American spider  English 《fly
  American dry fly. A wet fly called spider has been used in Britain for centuries. The dry fly spider in the US is completely different from the spider in Britain. For the sake of avoiding confusion, the spider made in the US is called an American spider in this book.
  The origin of this fly pattern appears to have been traced to Edward Hewitt, who was one of the founders of fly fishing in the U.S.A. The fly was tied on a small No.16 hook, and its hackle was a half inch to one and a half inches long. Originally, there was no body or tail in the fly. The fly floated vertically on the water surface, and the bend of the hook sank in the water. The whole hackle touched the water surface like a parachute hackle. Hewitt put the white hackle feather in the front for better visibility. Preston Jennings developed his own spider patterns such as Cream Variant or Spider, which had a long hackle, tinsel body, and a barb tail.
  Edson Leonard notes the following in his book "Flies" (1950): “The Spider is a comparatively new style of dry fly that has established a fine record for taking trout in waters that have become increasingly hard to fish. The acme of
sparseness and delicacy, the Spider is ideal in connection with the extremely fine 6X and 7X leader tippets, and offers practically no resistance to air when cast. “The Spider is truly the answer to the problem of catching brown trout in many of our eastern streams." He continued "There are two types of Spiders, one floats in the usual horizontal plane like other dry flies (such as Cream Variant or Spider), and the other comes to rest on the water surface with its hackles spread out radially and the hook dangling vertically in the water (such as Hewitt's Spider). Of the two types, the latter is generally considered more productive, “...that is, the illusion made by the sparse hackle is most excellent." For this latter type, he recommends the use of striped hackle like badger, and to turn the hackle around the shank just two times, and never more than three turns.
  John Atherton was a devotee of the American spider, and he described it as follows. "I was thoroughly convinced of one thing - that if I had to be limited to one dry fly it would be a spider, without any doubt. It can be used in so many more ways than a conventional fly; it is effective whether the water is high or low, colored or clear; and best of all, it brings up the large fish." (The Fly and the Fish, 1971)
ReferenceTelling on the trout, 1926. A trout and salmon fisherman, 1948. Hewitt's handbook of fly fishing, 1933. Tying & fishing terrestrials, 1978. A book of trout flies, 1935. Trout and salmon fly index, 1992. The fly and the fish, 1971. Flies (Leonard), 1950.
Edward Hewitt, vertical fly, Cream Variant, John Atherton
 
 
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Iwana, a native char of Japan.
Iwana, a native char of Japan.
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